Careers in Management Consulting for Researchers

Careers in Management Consulting for Researchers

 

Careers Service, 56 Banbury Road.

Mon 26 Sep 2016

16:00 – 18:00

 

If you are a current D.Phil student or recently completed your PhD and are curious to learn about what management consultants do, and if it might be for you, please join us at The Careers Service on Monday 26th September to hear from recent Oxford D.Phils who have successfully made the transitioned into the world of consulting at top firms.

 

Come and learn what a consultant does day-to-day; how the skills you are developing and using in your research might be relevant to a commercial career; and how you can best present your research and current experience during the recruitment process.

 

You will also hear about the panel’s own experiences whilst working as researchers: what were the key decision points for them in deciding to move away from research? What steps did they take to learn more about the careers they now follow? And, what did they do whilst working on their research to build relevant skills and experience to make successful applications?

 

There will also be the chance to hear more about how you can get involved in consulting work whilst undertaking your research and meet with recruiters from the firms to hear about the other events and opportunities they create tailored to D.Phil students, and how you can be first to learn about these. For example, next week McKinsey are running two D.Phil case workshops (sorry, but these are now full) and on 29th September, BCG are offering an evening event for D.Phils at the Said Business School: full details and how to sign up are on the CareerConnect events calendar.

 

 

Please Sign up in advance for this event on CareerConnect.

Panel Discussion on Impact in Science

What is research impact? How do we currently measure it? How should we measure it? Should scientists be measured in the same way that we measure scientific output? How do we effectively compare different kinds of impact?

 

The Better Science Initiative is delighted to be hosting the first panel discussion on Impact in Science bringing together leaders from different aspects of science. This event aims to bring all players to the table: students, researchers, academics, editors and entrepreneurs who want to make science better.

 

PANELLISTS

 

Mr Euan Adie

Founder & CEO at Altmetric

 

Dr Caroline Bucklow

Senior Knowledge Exchange Officer at Knowledge Exchange & Impact Team, Oxford University

 

Mr Richard Van Noorden

Senior News Editor at Nature Publishing Group

 

Professor Stephen Curry

Group Leader at Imperial College London and science blogger

 

Dr Beverley Sherbon

Impact & Evaluation Advisor at Researchfish

 

In the modern world, “impact” appears to be the fulcrum around which the entire research universe revolves. Not intellectual curiosity, not technical robustness and certainly not reproducibility. Impact. First and foremost: What impact has this research had? What impact will this research have? Acceptor of papers. Giver of grants. Maker of careers. Impact is king. In a highly competitive world of limited funding and limited time, evaluations of impact appear unavoidable. But what exactly is “impact” and how well do the current frameworks of evaluating research impact live up to the task? How could they be improved?

Register here for free. During the event, we will be seeking questions and contributions from the audience. For more information, contact: lea.sefer@wolfson.ox.ac.uk

 

What is The Better Science Initiative?

We are a newly founded organisation that aims to improve the systems around science. The systems that support and surround scientific research are often far from ideal and the conversations that are required to change them far from all-inclusive. We invite contributions from researchers at every level and all those in associated industries to address the shortcomings of our current systems and to seek strategies for improvement. Ultimately, we are concerned with facilitating better outcomes both for science and for scientists.

Find out more at https://thebetterscience.wordpress.com/

Pint of Science 2016

Do you love science and want to share this? Do you like a pint? Want to combine the two?

We are looking for volunteers to help us run Pint of Science 2016 events!

 

What is Pint of Science? Pint of Science is an annual festival that happens over three consecutive evenings simultaneously in multiple cities around the globe. Researchers come and explain their findings to the public in the comfort of a pub! It’s designed to be a fun activity aimed at the public who have an interest in knowing what’s going on in science research.

 

How does it work? There is usually one overarching scientific topic per pub – and each night there will be a selection of speakers who give a talk based on their research within this topic. In oxford we are hoping to have 4 pubs running this year (For more information on the topics and event please see the attached leaflet).

 

When are the events? 23 – 25 May 2016

 

How can you get involved? We are looking for volunteers to help run the event and become Event Managers! We have already organised venues and so your duties will include finding speakers and guiding them through the process; helping us to promote your pub and the talks happening and finally to host the nights.

 

If we have sparked your interest or you have any questions please email laurienne.gardner@gtc.ox.ac.uk.

 

We look forward to hearing from you!

OWN Newsletter – November 2015

Events

 

  • Understanding the opt-out revolution: How it fuels ambition and defines work-life balance, Professor Michelle Ryan, University of Exeter

 

Women continue to be under-represented in particular roles (such as leadership) and particular sectors (such as surgery or policing), and this has been explained by the fact that women actively choose to opt-out due to an innate lack of ambition and commitment. Michelle will present a series of studies to contradict such a claim and will demonstrate that women’s ambition erodes over time because perceptions of fit and belonging reduce with experience. Importantly, these fit processes have a strong impact of women’s perceptions of work-life balance and their willingness to make sacrifices for their careers. Implications for policy and practice will be discussed.

 

Full details can be found at: www.learning.ox.ac.uk/public/

 

Date: Thursday 12 November

Time: 3.30-4.30pm

Venue: Oxford Learning Institute, Littlegate House, St Ebbe’s

 

  • Anti-bullying week

 

Two talks will be held during anti-bullying week, which runs from 16-20 November: Respectful behaviour, unconscious bias awareness, equality and how they link with mental well-being and Bystander Intervention (19 November). All are welcome and no booking required. The EDU is also holding a poster competition with the theme of “responsible bystander”. For details see the latest Equality and Diversity Newsletter: www.admin.ox.ac.uk/eop/aboutus/

 

Date: Tuesday 17 and Thursday 19 November

Time: 2.00pm

Venue: Physical & Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory Lecture Theatre, South Parks Road

 

  • Question Time: Personnel and Equality

 

All staff are invited to the first in a series of termly Question Time sessions, on the topic of Personnel and Equality. These sessions offer the opportunity to hear about some of the major issues facing the University and to ask senior officers about the issues that matter to you. The sessions form part of a wider strategy from Council to improve communication about University business and to increase transparency about decision-making. Tea and coffee will be provided from 11.45am and you are welcome to bring your own lunch. To find out more and book a place, visit: www.ox.ac.uk/staff/staff_communications/question-time.

 

Date: Monday 23 November

Time: 12.15-1.30pm

Venue: Oxford Martin School (corner of Holywell and Catte Streets)

 

  • Annual Diversity Conference: Pride and Prejudice – breaking down barriers in science

 

The Royal Society’s Annual Diversity Conference will examine the barriers to entry and progression in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) that impact underrepresented groups with a particular focus on bias. The keynote speaker is Harvard Professor Mahzarin R. Banaji, founder of Project Implicit, who will deliver an interactive seminar entitled ‘Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People’. Project Implicit is utilised extensively in the field of unconscious bias. The event is free and all are welcome but booking is required: https://royalsociety.org/events/2015/11/diversity-conference/

Date: Monday 23 November

Time: 10.00am-4.00pm

Venue: The Royal Society, London, 6-9 Carlton House Terrace, London, SW1Y 5AG

 

  • Devaki Jain Lecture with Graça Machel

 

Graça Machel will talk on the topic of ‘Leadership in Modern Africa: a feminist perspective’. Graça Machel DBE is a Mozambican politician and humanitarian. She is the widow of former South African president Nelson Mandela and of Mozambican president Samora Machel. She is an international advocate for women’s and children’s rights and in 1997 was made a British dame for her humanitarian work. The event is free but booking is required: www.st-annes.ox.ac.uk/about/events/event/2015/11/25//tx_cal_phpicalendar/devaki-jain-inaugural-lecture-with-graca-machel

 

Date: Wednesday 25 November

Time: 11.00am

Venue: St Anne’s College, Woodstock Road

 

  • Ada Lovelace Symposium 2015

 

The Ada Lovelace Symposium 2015 celebrates the 200th birthday of computer visionary Ada Lovelace. In addition to the main Symposium, there will be a workshop for graduate students and early career researchers on 8 December to discuss the varied cultural legacies of this extraordinary mathematician. Further details are available at: http://blogs.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/adalovelace and registration is at: www.oxforduniversitystores.co.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&catid=70&prodid=386. Symposium Registration costs £40, and attendance at the Ada Lovelace birthday dinner, in Balliol College, £50.

 

Date: 9-10 December (Symposium)

Venue: The Mathematical Institute, Oxford

 

 

Women at Oxford

 

  • Susan Jebb, professor of diet and population health at the University of Oxford, is the joint winner, with Professor Edzard Ernst, of this year’s John Maddox Prize for standing up for science. The prize, named in honour of Sir John Maddox, a former editor of the journal Naturewho was a fearless defender of science, is designed to recognise scientists who argue for the rational assessment of scientific evidence in the face of deep, personal hostility. ‘In Susan Jebb and Edzard Ernst, we have two individuals who have used their scientific insights as a basis for principled positions about sugar and complementary medicine, respectively,’ said Sir Philip Campbell, editor-in-chief of Nature and a member of the judging panel. ‘Both of them have felt the intense heat of influential opposition and have stood by their views, at who-knows-what cost to themselves’.
  • Oxford physicist Dr Tessa Baker has won the Women of the Future Award for Science. Dr Baker is a post-doctoral research fellow in the Department of Physics and a fellow of All Souls College. The awards recognise young female talent in the UK.

 

Funding opportunities

 

  • The Vice Chancellor’s Diversity Fund and Returning Carers’ Fund

Applications are invited to the Vice Chancellor’s Diversity Fund and the Returning Carers’ Fund, with deadlines for applications on Friday 20 November and Wednesday 11 November respectively. Full details and application forms are available on the Equality and Diversity Unit’s website:

 

VC’s Diversity Fund: www.admin.ox.ac.uk/eop/inpractice/vc-fund/

Returning Carers’ Fund: www.admin.ox.ac.uk/eop/inpractice/vc-fund/returning-carers/

 

In the case of the Vice Chancellor’s Diversity Fund it should be noted that no more than £150,000 will be available in total, and that bids that impact on more than one department are likely to be prioritised. In assessing bids, the Advisory Group on the Fund will consider the range of projects already agreed and applicants are advised to familiarise themselves with these: www.admin.ox.ac.uk/eop/inpractice/vc-fund/projects/. Bids in new areas and those demonstrating innovation will be welcomed, particularly applications for projects addressing a) inequalities in the Humanities and b) race equality, areas which have been notably underrepresented to date.

 

Any enquiries from prospective applicants should be directed to the relevant Divisional contact, as below, or the Equality & Diversity Unit (gender.equality@admin.ox.ac.uk).

  • Continuing Education: Peter Gambles
  • Humanities: Catherine McKiernan
  • Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences: Daisy Hung
  • Medical Sciences: Bríd Cronin
  • Social Sciences: Stephen Conway (VC’s Diversity Fund), Tanya Baldwin (Returning Carers’ Fund)

 

 

Job opportunities

 

  • Daphne Jackson Fellowships

Applications are invited for three University of Oxford-sponsored Daphne Jackson Fellowships that will be hosted in departments within the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division (MPLS) or the Medical Sciences Division (MSD). This Fellowship is intended for individuals returning to research after a career break of two or more years, in the any of the disciplines covered by the two Divisions. Fellows are paid a salary, with an additional allowance for expenses such as conference attendance, and are offered retraining and mentoring opportunities to give Fellows the confidence and skills they need to successfully return to research. Fellowships are part-time over two years and consist of a stimulating research project and at least 100 hours of retraining per year. The closing date for applications is 12.00 noon on 8 January 2016. The posts are now live on the University job vacancy site: http://tinyurl.com/ovznttv.

 

Articles and resources

 

  • Is Britain Fairer?

 

In 2010, the Equality and Human Rights Commission produced its first report on equality (How Fair is Britain?) and separate report on human rights (the Human Rights Review) in 2012. Is Britain Fairer? is the Commission’s follow-up report on both equality and human rights. The report outlines the Commission’s findings and sets out the challenges for the future.

 

www.equalityhumanrights.com/about-us/our-work/key-projects/britain-fairer/great-britain-report

New jobs.ac.uk online event: Doing a PhD in Germany

jobs.ac.uk is holding a free online video event on 25th November called ‘PhD Options: Doing a PhD in Germany’.

 

More details are at: http://bit.ly/PhD-Germany-Hangout-2

 

This event is open to anyone and is completely free of charge.    Here is a little more detail:

 

Researchers have become increasingly internationally mobile. In fact, being mobile early on in your career undoubtedly enhances your prospects and skills by expanding your networks and access to a larger research community.

 

Germany has over 140 doctorate awarding higher education institutions, many of which don’t charge tuition fees. To help you explore the opportunities in Germany, jobs.ac.uk is holding a FREE 60-minute live video event via a Google+ Hangout on Air called ‘PhD Options: Doing a PhD in Germany’. Find out more and register today.

Do you want to apply your scientific training to make a difference to society?

The Science and Engineering Fast Stream is the flagship postgraduate development scheme for scientists and engineers across Government – and it needs people like you.

 

Science and Engineering Fast Streamers take on a range of roles in multiple government departments, and play an essential role in ensuring the best science underpins the development and application of government policies. This can be by acting as an expert customer, or by developing an evidence base or by undertaking systematic analysis. Science and Engineering Fast Streamers are not bench scientists or technical engineers. Instead, they source, analyse and communicate technical advice and innovative solutions on issues as diverse as climate change, nuclear non-proliferation, defence technology and food production.

 

Applications to start in September 2016 are open until 30th November 2015.

For more information, please refer to https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/civil-service-generalist-fast-stream/fast-stream-science-and-engineering or contact Rosie Powell-Tuck rosie.powell-tuck@bis.gsi.gov.uk

 

Pint of Science Recruitment

Do you love science and want to share this? Do you like a pint? Want to combine the two?

We are looking for volunteers to help us run Pint of Science 2016 events!

What is Pint of Science? Pint of Science is an annual festival that happens over three consecutive evenings simultaneously in multiple cities around the globe. Researchers come and explain their findings to the public in the comfort of a pub! It’s designed to be a fun activity aimed at the public who have an interest in knowing what’s going on in science research.

How does it work? There is usually one overarching scientific topic per pub – and each night there will be a selection of speakers who give a talk based on their research within this topic. In oxford we are hoping to have 4 pubs running this year (For more information on the topics and event please see the attached leaflet).

 

When are the events? 23 – 25 May 2016

How can you get involved? We are looking for volunteers to help run the event and become Event Managers! We have already organised venues and so your duties will include finding speakers and guiding them through the process; helping us to promote your pub and the talks happening and finally to host the nights.

If we have sparked your interest or you have any questions please email laurienne.gardner@gtc.ox.ac.uk.